Ebony G. Patterson
Kingston, Jamaica, b. 1981

Ebony G. Patterson is one of the most compelling emerging talents in Jamaican art. After graduating from the Edna Manley College in 2004, she obtained her Masters in Fine Arts at the Washington University in St. Louis in 2006.
A regular exhibitor a the National Gallery since 2006, she had her greatest impact to date in the Young Talent V exhibition, with photographically derived, embellished tapestries and the decorated body of a car mounted on a plinth as a “sculpture.” Hers is a uniquely Caribbean aesthetic that melds elements of “high” and “low” art and draws from carnival costuming, Haitian sequined flags, and above all the “bling” of Jamaican Dancehall fashion. Always concerned with issues of gender, sexuality and the body…
Ebony’s latest body of work, under the general heading Gangstas for Life, is, at its core, a conversation about gender construction in the Jamaican Dancehall.Gangstas for Life started by exploring the fashionable practice of skin bleaching in the “gangsta” culture but the most recent work has included other fashionable exploits previously associated with the feminine and the wider so-called “bling culture” – the embracing of a feminized aesthetic which stands in striking contrast with Dancehall’s rhetorical homophobia.  The images raise questions about changing perceptions of masculinity within a Jamaican context and raises larger questions about beauty, gender ideals and constructs of masculinity within popular Black culture…

Ebony G. Patterson

Kingston, Jamaica, b. 1981

Ebony G. Patterson is one of the most compelling emerging talents in Jamaican art. After graduating from the Edna Manley College in 2004, she obtained her Masters in Fine Arts at the Washington University in St. Louis in 2006.

A regular exhibitor a the National Gallery since 2006, she had her greatest impact to date in the Young Talent V exhibition, with photographically derived, embellished tapestries and the decorated body of a car mounted on a plinth as a “sculpture.” Hers is a uniquely Caribbean aesthetic that melds elements of “high” and “low” art and draws from carnival costuming, Haitian sequined flags, and above all the “bling” of Jamaican Dancehall fashion. Always concerned with issues of gender, sexuality and the body

Ebony’s latest body of work, under the general heading Gangstas for Life, is, at its core, a conversation about gender construction in the Jamaican Dancehall.Gangstas for Life started by exploring the fashionable practice of skin bleaching in the “gangsta” culture but the most recent work has included other fashionable exploits previously associated with the feminine and the wider so-called “bling culture” – the embracing of a feminized aesthetic which stands in striking contrast with Dancehall’s rhetorical homophobia.  The images raise questions about changing perceptions of masculinity within a Jamaican context and raises larger questions about beauty, gender ideals and constructs of masculinity within popular Black culture

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